9 Artists to watch during and after the Venice Biennale

While I was visiting the international exhibition, I noticed a certain ambition towards depicting human failure as well as human tragedies including acts of violence, slavery and suppression. My artist guide is based on the works of art whichever managed to capture the pivotal idea of La Biennale this year including many diverse approaches towards the human way of living life.

Highlights not to be missed at Parallel Vienna 2018

The aim of Parallel Vienna is to present young and emerging artists, side by side, bringing together artistic initiatives of all kind. Furthermore, Parallel wishes to give equal space to both Austrian and international artists / galleries, fostering a platform of exchange. 

The 2018 Venice Biennale guide

However, architecture as an exhibition theme was officially added to the Biennale’s activities only in the 1970s, in events, which adopted a historical approach, such as “Italian Architecture during Fascism” (1976). In 1980 the 1st Architecture Biennale opened its doors. This marked the beginning of a new phase of the Biennale, which was characterized by various collateral events and the expansion of the locations in the city, including the Arsenale.

W&K Gallery: From European modernism to Austrian contemporary art

The Baroque State rooms of the Palais Schönborn-Batthyány, built in the 17th century are deemed for the presentation of museum exhibitions. From 25 May until 14 September, W&K is presenting selected works by the Austrian artist Walter Vopava in the baroque Palais Schönborn-Batthyany. The installation is evoking an interesting and harmonic interplay of abstract paintings and baroque state rooms.

Keith Haring: The street artist as political activist

Keith Haring’s art gets very often associated with rather amusing or humorous illustrations. But if you dare to take a closer look, you may as well find some rather negative, sometimes even frightening symbols of topics such as violence, hate and power structures. Haring himself conceived his artistic practice as a political statement in the public realm of New York.

Chicago art project at Fondazione Prada

The project is focused on the employment of a painting style characterised by a political commitment, figurative narratives and radical graphics that have been rejected by New York’s mainstream culture. The exhibition is structured around three thematic sections, all of them devoted to two generations of artists formed in Chicago between the 1950s and 60s.

Behind the scenes: Rubens in Vienna

While any usual visitor is mot able to see how much work and preparation lies behind a big exhibition, I have been experiencing the organization very closely. Altogether the exhibition process took around two years, which results an intensive working time. Not only the curator herself was placing high expectations in the show – Indeed the show is being very successful, so far.

Raphael: A retrospective in Vienna

The Albertina Museum is paying tribute to Raphael with a major exhibition of 150 paintings and drawings. Starting from the Museum’s own significant holdings and rounded out by the most impressive and important drawings from famous museums such as the Uffizi, the Royal Collection of the British Royal Family, the British Museum, the Louvre, the Vatican Museums, and the Ashmolean Museum, this monographic presentation places Raphael’s thinking and conceptual process front and center.

Atelier Brancusi: A fusion of sculptures and space

Brancusi considered the relationship between sculptures and the space around them to be very important. In the 1910s he created new works within the studio which he called “mobile groups”, underlining the connections between the works and the possibilities of each for moving within the group.

Paris celebrates Rodin

The year 2017 marks the 100th anniversary of French sculptor Auguste Rodin’s death. The centenary is being celebrated with a lot of interesting exhibitions. Beyond I will you offer you a guide covering two of the most important venues in his birth and workplace Paris – his museum and the show at Grand Palais.